Agenda and minutes

Council
Tuesday 26th February 2019 6.00 pm

Venue: Guildhall, High Street, Exeter

Contact: Sarah Selway, Democratic Services Manager (Committees)  Telephone 01392 265275 or email  sarah.selway@exeter.gov.uk

Items
No. Item

1.

Apologies

Minutes:

Apologies were received for absence from the Lord Mayor, Councillors Denham, Foggin, Gottschalk, Newby and Robson.

 

 

2.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 255 KB

To approve and sign the minutes of the meeting held on 18 December 2018.

Minutes:

The minutes of the Ordinary meeting of the Council held on 18 December 2018 were moved by the Leader, seconded by Councillor Sutton, taken as read, approved and signed as correct.

 

 

3.

Official Communications

Minutes:

The Deputy Lord Mayor, on behalf of the Council, congratulated Councillor Denham and former Councillor Williams who had both recently given birth - a daughter and twin son and daughter respectively.

 

The Deputy Lord Mayor announced that the Lord Mayor’s Civic Service would be held at St. Thomas Methodist Church on Sunday 3 March 2019 at 10.30am.

 

 

4.

Petition

Minutes:

The Deputy Lord Mayor invited Ms Valerie Jarrett, the petition organiser to present a petition to Council which “asked the Council to respect the recommendation of the Place Scrutiny Committee of 31 January and to move an amendment to exclude the sale of the Exeter ski slope from the potential sale of the Clifton Hill site”.  As the petition had surpassed 2,000 signatures, having received 2,624 signatures, and in accordance with the City Council’s Petition Scheme, Ms Jarrett was invited to address the Council for a period of up to five minutes. She had also submitted a number of questions in this respect.

 

Ms Jarrett spoke on behalf of the Exeter Ski Club and Adapted Ski Club and set out their disappointment over the potential sale of the site, which would mean the inevitable closure of the Exeter Ski Club, a member run Club for over 50 years, along with the Exeter Adaptive Ski Club which had also been on the site for 30 years, with users potentially having to make the journey to artificial ski slopes further afield.

 

Ms Jarrett commented on the lack of a specific valuation, as the land on which the ski slope lay was steep and contaminated, and would, in her opinion, cost a significant sum to stabilise. She suggested that a relocation of the scheme by approximately 30 yards would enable the ski slope to remain, and therefore the existence of the two clubs. The Ski clubs had produced a plan to minimise the impact of the ski slope on any future housing development, by suggesting moving the car park, changing the lighting, and introducing screening to mitigate any noise.  The Ski Clubs were also concerned about the future of their assets which included ski equipment, matting and the accommodation which they felt was held by the Club for the benefit of the Exeter community.

 

The Ski clubs had also commented on the suggestion that a ski simulator might offer an alternative provision, but as well as the high cost, this was not considered an adequate alternative to a dry ski slope, particularly for the users of the Adaptive Ski Club as there were no qualified instructors, which would in turn mean that no insurance would be available, therefore, in this respect, making the option unworkable, and the costs to users would be prohibitive. The Adapted Ski Club had passed on these concerns to the Council.  Ms Jarrett also referred to the suggestion that the Council would work with the Ski clubs to find an alternative location, but she felt that the costs of up to £1.5 million would make this unlikely.

 

Ms Jarrett made a final plea to Members to save the ski slope, referring to the many successes of former Members and to save this valuable resource for the community.

 

Council considered the request of the club as part of the debate on Minute No 21 of the meeting of Executive on 12 February 2019 (see Minute No.15 below).

 

 

 

5.

Planning Committee - 7 January 2019 pdf icon PDF 71 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the Planning Committee of 7 January 2019 were presented by the Chair, Councillor Sutton, and taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Planning Committee held on 7 January 2019 be received.

 

6.

Planning Committee - 11 February 2019 pdf icon PDF 126 KB

Minutes:

Councillor Mrs Thompson declared a disclosable pecuniary interest in Minute No.10 and left the meeting during consideration of this item.

 

The minutes of the Planning Committee of 11 February 2019 were presented by the Chair, Councillor Sutton, and taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Planning Committee held on 11 February 2019 be received.

 

7.

Licensing Committee - 5 February 2019 pdf icon PDF 82 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the Licensing Committee of 5 February 2019 were presented by the Chair, Councillor Owen, and taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Licensing Committee held on 5 February 2019 be received.

 

 

8.

People Scrutiny Committee - 10 January 2019 pdf icon PDF 92 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the People Scrutiny Committee of 10 January 2019 were presented by the Chair, Councillor Wardle, and taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the People Scrutiny Committee held on 10 January 2019 be received.

 

 

9.

Place Scrutiny Committee - 17 January 2019 pdf icon PDF 126 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the Place Scrutiny Committee of 17 January 2019 were presented by the Chair, Councillor Sills, and taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Place Scrutiny Committee held on 17 January 2019 be received.

 

 

10.

Place Scrutiny Committee - Special - 31 January 2019 pdf icon PDF 129 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the Place Scrutiny Committee - Special - of 31 January 2019 were presented by the Chair, Councillor Sills, and, subject to a query on the accuracy of one minute which the Chair undertook to address at the next meeting, taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Place Scrutiny Committee - Special - held on 31 January 2019 be received.

 

 

11.

Corporate Services Scrutiny Committee - 24 January 2019 pdf icon PDF 99 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the Corporate Services Scrutiny Committee of 24 January 2019 were presented by the Chair, Councillor Sheldon, and taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Corporate Services Scrutiny Committee held on 24 January 2019 be received.

 

 

 

12.

Strata Joint Scrutiny Committee - 14 January 2019 pdf icon PDF 100 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the Strata Joint Scrutiny Committee of 14 January 2019 were presented by the Deputy Lord Mayor and taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Strata Joint Scrutiny Committee held on 14 January 2019 be received.

 

 

13.

Strata Joint Executive Committee - 28 January 2019 pdf icon PDF 101 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the Strata Joint Executive Committee of 28 January 2019 were presented by Councillor Edwards, and taken as read.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of the Strata Joint Executive Committee held on 28 January 2019 be received.

 

 

Councillor Keen left the meeting at this point.

 

 

 

14.

Executive - 15 January 2019 pdf icon PDF 70 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the Executive of 15 January 2019 were presented by the Leader, Councillor Edwards, and taken as read.

 

In respect of Minute No. 5 (2019/20 Budget Strategy and Medium Term Financial Plan), the Leader moved and the Deputy Leader seconded the recommendations and they were carried.

 

In respect of Minute No. 7 (Creation of a Second Post of a CIL and Section 106 Monitoring Officer), the Leader moved and the Deputy Leader seconded the recommendation and it was carried.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of Executive held on 15 January 2019 be received and, where appropriate, adopted.

 

 

15.

Executive - 12 February 2019 pdf icon PDF 31 MB

Minutes:

The minutes of the Executive of 12 February 2019, with the exception of Minute No. 6 which had been considered at the Extraordinary Council meeting immediately preceding this meeting, were presented by the Leader, Councillor Edwards, and taken as read.

 

In respect of Minute No. 14 (Vision for a Transformational Housing Delivery Programme), both the Portfolio holder for Economy and Culture and the Portfolio Holder for Health and Wellbeing, Communities and Sport welcomed the vision for delivering a transformational housing programme for Exeter which, over the next 20 years, would support planning in the city and the production of the Greater Exeter Strategic Plan (GESP).

 

Exeter had to provide for 13,100 houses within its municipal boundaries in the next 20 years with a total of 53,000 required for the GESP area. This emerging vision was to make Exeter one of the leading global cities in the area and to effectively respond to urban challenges and environmental futures.

 

The Leader moved and the Deputy Leader seconded the recommendation and it was carried.

 

In respect of Minute No. 19 (The Prudential Code for Capital Finance in Local Authorities (Incorporating) the Annual Statement of Minimum Revenue Provision), the Leader moved and the Deputy Leader seconded the recommendations and they were carried.

 

In respect of Minute No. 18 (Treasury Management Strategy 2019/20), the Leader moved and the Deputy Leader seconded the recommendation and it was carried.

 

 

Minute No. 21 (Update Report on Built Sports and Leisure Facilities),

 

Following on from the earlier presentation of a petition seeking the retention of the Ski Slope and its exclusion from the sale of the wider Clifton Hill site, the Deputy Lord Mayor reported thatquestions had been received from Councillors Mrs Thompson, Musgrave and Prowse in accordance with Standing Order Number 8, relating specifically to the recommendation on the future of Clifton Hill. She therefore invited those questioners to ask their specific questions at the start of the debate on this matter as follows:

 

Questions from Councillor Thompson

 

Question – It has been confirmed in reports to Committees, the Clifton Hill site will be offered for sale on the 'Open Market', so will the City Council's Private Development Company be making an offer for the site in competition with other private developers?

 

The Leader responded and stated that it was a matter for the Directors as to whether Exeter City Living chooses to submit a bid for the site.  However, it was important to note that the site had not been approved as part of the current business plan and the cost was likely to be in excess of the devolved financial amounts that they were able to spend.  Therefore, if Exeter City Living wish to bid for the site, they would need to submit a suitable, robust business case to Council for consideration.

 

Question - By not specifically getting a valuation for only the brown field Clifton Hill Sports Centre Building site, to exclude the golf range, ski slope, rifle range and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 15.

16.

Executive - 14 February 2019 (adjourned from 12 February 2019) pdf icon PDF 83 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the adjourned Executive of 14 February 2019 were presented by the Leader, Councillor Edwards, and taken as read.

 

In respect of Minute No. 26 (Annual Pay Policy Statement), the Leader moved and the Deputy Leader seconded the recommendations and they were carried.

 

In respect of Minute No. 28 (Exeter City Living Business Plan) the Leader moved and the Deputy Leader seconded the recommendations and they were carried.

 

RESOLVED that the minutes of Executive held on 14 February 2019 be received and, where appropriate, adopted.

 

 

17.

Notice of Motion by Councillor Musgrave under Standing Order No. 6

Climate Emergency

 

Full Council notes:-

 

1.         The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, published last November, describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is likely to cause compared to a 1.5°C rise but that limiting warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities.

2.         City Councils in the UK and around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency.

3.         Exeter City Council has previously published a Climate Change strategy and action plan. This plan from 2008-2018 sought to address emissions related to homes, businesses, new developments, transport and waste but many of the targets set in this strategy were not met.

4.         There is a partnership between Exeter City Council and Exeter City Futures which seeks to bring together local government, the private sector and communities to jointly address carbon emissions, particularly related to transport and energy.

 

Full Council believes that:-

 

1.         Cities are uniquely placed to lead the world in reducing carbon emissions, as they are in many ways easier to decarbonise than rural areas – for example, because of their capacity for heat networks and mass transit;

2.         Strategies and action plans to date, delivered by Exeter City Council acting alone, or in partnership with other bodies have lacked the necessary ambition to adequately contribute to prevent an overshoot of the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C warming limit before 2050;

3.         There are extensive expertise and commitment across Exeter to tackle our climate emergency and working partnerships between local agencies, experts, communities, activists and residents can bring about profound change;

4.         Bold climate action can deliver economic benefits in terms of new jobs, economic savings and market opportunities, as well as improved well-being and quality of life for Exeter residents through for example lower fuel bills, reduced air pollution and healthier more active lifestyles.

 

Full Council agrees to:-

 

1.         Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’;

2.         Pledge to make the city of Exeter carbon neutral by 2030 or sooner, taking into account both production and consumption emissions;

3.         Call on Westminster to provide the powers and resources to make the 2030 target possible;

4.         Continue to work with partners across the city and region, including Devon County Council, to deliver this new goal through all relevant strategies and plans;

5.         Work with other cities regionally, nationally and internationally that have declared a similar climate emergency to determine and implement best practice methods to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030 or sooner 5 ;

6.         Report to Full Council within six months with a climate emergency strategy, and clear action plan with budget.

7.         Review progress on the action plan annually through the Council’s scrutiny process.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Musgrave, seconded by Councillor Mitchell, moved a Motion in the following terms:-

Climate Emergency

 

Full Council notes:-

 

1.         The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, published last November, describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is likely to cause compared to a 1.5°C rise but that limiting warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities.

2.         City Councils in the UK and around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency.

3.         Exeter City Council has previously published a Climate Change strategy and action plan. This plan from 2008-2018 sought to address emissions related to homes, businesses, new developments, transport and waste but many of the targets set in this strategy were not met.

4.         There is a partnership between Exeter City Council and Exeter City Futures which seeks to bring together local government, the private sector and communities to jointly address carbon emissions, particularly related to transport and energy.

 

Full Council believes that:-

 

1.         Cities are uniquely placed to lead the world in reducing carbon emissions, as they are in many ways easier to decarbonise than rural areas – for example, because of their capacity for heat networks and mass transit;

2.         Strategies and action plans to date, delivered by Exeter City Council acting alone, or in partnership with other bodies have lacked the necessary ambition to adequately contribute to prevent an overshoot of the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C warming limit before 2050;

3.         There are extensive expertise and commitment across Exeter to tackle our climate emergency and working partnerships between local agencies, experts, communities, activists and residents can bring about profound change;

4.         Bold climate action can deliver economic benefits in terms of new jobs, economic savings and market opportunities, as well as improved well-being and quality of life for Exeter residents through for example lower fuel bills, reduced air pollution and healthier more active lifestyles.

 

Full Council agrees to:-

 

1.         Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’;

2.         Pledge to make the city of Exeter carbon neutral by 2030 or sooner, taking into account both production and consumption emissions;

3.         Call on Westminster to provide the powers and resources to make the 2030 target possible;

4.         Continue to work with partners across the city and region, including Devon County Council, to deliver this new goal through all relevant strategies and plans;

5.         Work with other cities regionally, nationally and internationally that have declared a similar climate emergency to determine and implement best practice methods to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030 or sooner;

6.         Report to Full Council within six months with a climate emergency strategy, and clear action plan with budget.

7.         Review progress on the action plan annually through the Council’s scrutiny process.

 

 

Councillor Musgrave referred to the urgent need for the Council to act pointing out that 40 other authorities had already declared Climate Emergencies. Whilst the City Council had  ...  view the full minutes text for item 17.

18.

Questions from Members of the Council under Standing Order No 8.

Question from Councillor Mrs Thompson

 

It has been confirmed in reports to Committees, the Clifton Hill site will be offered for sale on the 'Open Market', so will the City Council's Private Development Company be making an offer for the site in competition with other private developers?

 

Question from Councillor Mrs Thompson

 

By not specifically getting a valuation for only the brown field Clifton Hill Sports Centre Building site, to exclude the golf range, ski slope, rifle range and green open spaces (to include purpose built student accommodation), has the Council, whilst meeting the legal requirements, effectively created a 'best consideration avoidance'?

Question from Councillor Mrs Thompson

 

As Executive did not exclude the ski slope from the sale of the whole Clifton Hill site, was this to avoid triggering the need for another valuation of the remaining land where best consideration for purpose built student accommodation could possibly exceed the £9 million approx. valuation for the sale of the whole site?

 

Question from Councillor Mrs Thompson

 

Recent Exeter City Council Planning Applications on City Council owned land have not met the Councils own planning policy of providing 35% social housing but with approx 2500 on the City Council housing waiting list is it fair for the Council to develop through the Councils own private development company properties for sale on the open market when this land in Council ownership presents an opportunity for the Council to build the much needed Council housing?

 

Question from Councillor Mrs Thompson

 

Is the City Council selling off assets of Council owned land for private housing in order  to generate Community Infrastructure Levy, of which a significant sum will be contributed to the Bus Station redevelopment, whereas building Council properties for rent to Council tenants on Council land would be exempt from CIL?

 

Minutes:

In accordance with Standing Order No.8, Councillor Thompson put the following questions to the Leader.

 

Question - Recent Exeter City Council Planning Applications on City Council owned land have not met the Councils own planning policy of providing 35% social housing but with approximately 2500 on the City Council housing waiting list is it fair for the Council to develop through the Councils own private development company properties for sale on the open market when this land in Council ownership presents an opportunity for the Council to build the much needed Council housing?

 

The Leader responded that the Council agreed to establish a Development Company to increase the amount of housing of different tenures available to local residents as well as make a profit for the Council to counter the reduction in funding from the Government. The provision of affordable housing is always subject to an assessment of viability of the Scheme. For the application for Hamlin Gardens, the viability assessment which was corroborated by independent advisors confirmed that 35% Affordable Housing was not viable and indeed, this had already been identified in the Business Case for the Exeter Living which was approved by Council in 2018.

 

Councillor Thompson asked a supplementary question seeking an explanation on how the 2,500 Council waiting list would be addressed.

 

The Leader referred to the Council’s policy commitment to provide homes for people, being the only Council in Devon to have built Council houses in recent years. He stated that those houses built by the Council were of passivhaus standard. He also said that one third of all housing built was social housing or affordable rent. He was proud of the Council’s track record

 

Question -Is the City Council selling off assets of Council owned land for private housing in order to generate Community Infrastructure Levy, of which a significant sum will be contributed to the Bus Station redevelopment, whereas building Council properties for rent to Council tenants on Council land would be exempt from CIL?

 

The Leader responded that No, the decision to sell Council owned assets is to maximise revenue to the Council, in the light of the financial challenges faced by the Council through on-going central Government funding cuts.

.

The Council is developing an ambitious programme for the development of Social Housing properties as a response to the lifting of the borrowing cap for the Housing Revenue Account, which will be presented to Members in due course.

 

In accordance with Standing Order No.8, Councillor Musgrave put the following questions to the Leader.

Question - WestExe residents have noticed that the pool at Riverside appears to be filled in, can the Council explain this?

The Leader responded that this is part of the overall works to re- open the Swimming Pool. As stated in the report (Para 8.2.4) we have identified significantstructural faults to the block and beam flooring and surround of the pool. Contractors have been instructed to prepare the pool for replacement using existing funding.  The  ...  view the full minutes text for item 18.